<YEAH WRITE!

theparisreview:

“This late-night walking is the one thing about the city that’s most saturated my work.” Ansel Elkins, our poet-in-residence at the Standard, East Village, talks to The New Yorker about her experience.

Illustration: Tom Bachtell.

Source: theparisreview

6ansel elkins,

This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.
All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton&#8217;s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her &#8220;circle&#8221;. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.
I wish that they&#8217;d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these&#8212;based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she&#8217;s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It&#8217;d be awesome if the music was modern too&#8230; think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could&#8217;ve been. Ugh it&#8217;d be so good!!!
If you&#8217;re a writer and haven&#8217;t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you&#8217;re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that&#8217;s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I&#8217;m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I&#8217;m making my way through her entire collected works; I&#8217;m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can&#8217;t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.
I guess you could say you&#8217;d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters&#8217; heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time&#8230; in one story there&#8217;s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in &#8220;that artist&#8217;s neighborhood full of Bohemians&#8221;, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too&#8212;her most famous book about &#8220;peasants&#8221; is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage&#8212;Wharton&#8217;s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary&#8212;on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.&#8212;are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton&#8217;s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 
Okay, that&#8217;s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 
*What they didn&#8217;t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you&#8217;ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James&#8217; The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I&#8217;ve ever read.
ZoomInfo
This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.
All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton&#8217;s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her &#8220;circle&#8221;. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.
I wish that they&#8217;d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these&#8212;based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she&#8217;s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It&#8217;d be awesome if the music was modern too&#8230; think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could&#8217;ve been. Ugh it&#8217;d be so good!!!
If you&#8217;re a writer and haven&#8217;t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you&#8217;re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that&#8217;s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I&#8217;m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I&#8217;m making my way through her entire collected works; I&#8217;m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can&#8217;t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.
I guess you could say you&#8217;d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters&#8217; heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time&#8230; in one story there&#8217;s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in &#8220;that artist&#8217;s neighborhood full of Bohemians&#8221;, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too&#8212;her most famous book about &#8220;peasants&#8221; is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage&#8212;Wharton&#8217;s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary&#8212;on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.&#8212;are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton&#8217;s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 
Okay, that&#8217;s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 
*What they didn&#8217;t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you&#8217;ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James&#8217; The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I&#8217;ve ever read.
ZoomInfo
This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.
All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton&#8217;s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her &#8220;circle&#8221;. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.
I wish that they&#8217;d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these&#8212;based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she&#8217;s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It&#8217;d be awesome if the music was modern too&#8230; think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could&#8217;ve been. Ugh it&#8217;d be so good!!!
If you&#8217;re a writer and haven&#8217;t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you&#8217;re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that&#8217;s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I&#8217;m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I&#8217;m making my way through her entire collected works; I&#8217;m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can&#8217;t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.
I guess you could say you&#8217;d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters&#8217; heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time&#8230; in one story there&#8217;s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in &#8220;that artist&#8217;s neighborhood full of Bohemians&#8221;, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too&#8212;her most famous book about &#8220;peasants&#8221; is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage&#8212;Wharton&#8217;s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary&#8212;on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.&#8212;are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton&#8217;s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 
Okay, that&#8217;s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 
*What they didn&#8217;t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you&#8217;ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James&#8217; The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I&#8217;ve ever read.
ZoomInfo
This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.
All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton&#8217;s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her &#8220;circle&#8221;. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.
I wish that they&#8217;d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these&#8212;based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she&#8217;s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It&#8217;d be awesome if the music was modern too&#8230; think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could&#8217;ve been. Ugh it&#8217;d be so good!!!
If you&#8217;re a writer and haven&#8217;t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you&#8217;re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that&#8217;s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I&#8217;m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I&#8217;m making my way through her entire collected works; I&#8217;m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can&#8217;t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.
I guess you could say you&#8217;d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters&#8217; heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time&#8230; in one story there&#8217;s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in &#8220;that artist&#8217;s neighborhood full of Bohemians&#8221;, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too&#8212;her most famous book about &#8220;peasants&#8221; is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage&#8212;Wharton&#8217;s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary&#8212;on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.&#8212;are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton&#8217;s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 
Okay, that&#8217;s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 
*What they didn&#8217;t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you&#8217;ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James&#8217; The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I&#8217;ve ever read.
ZoomInfo
This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.
All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton&#8217;s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her &#8220;circle&#8221;. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.
I wish that they&#8217;d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these&#8212;based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she&#8217;s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It&#8217;d be awesome if the music was modern too&#8230; think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could&#8217;ve been. Ugh it&#8217;d be so good!!!
If you&#8217;re a writer and haven&#8217;t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you&#8217;re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that&#8217;s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I&#8217;m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I&#8217;m making my way through her entire collected works; I&#8217;m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can&#8217;t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.
I guess you could say you&#8217;d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters&#8217; heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time&#8230; in one story there&#8217;s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in &#8220;that artist&#8217;s neighborhood full of Bohemians&#8221;, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too&#8212;her most famous book about &#8220;peasants&#8221; is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage&#8212;Wharton&#8217;s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary&#8212;on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.&#8212;are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton&#8217;s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 
Okay, that&#8217;s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 
*What they didn&#8217;t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you&#8217;ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James&#8217; The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I&#8217;ve ever read.
ZoomInfo
This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.
All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton&#8217;s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her &#8220;circle&#8221;. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.
I wish that they&#8217;d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these&#8212;based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she&#8217;s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It&#8217;d be awesome if the music was modern too&#8230; think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could&#8217;ve been. Ugh it&#8217;d be so good!!!
If you&#8217;re a writer and haven&#8217;t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you&#8217;re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that&#8217;s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I&#8217;m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I&#8217;m making my way through her entire collected works; I&#8217;m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can&#8217;t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.
I guess you could say you&#8217;d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters&#8217; heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time&#8230; in one story there&#8217;s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in &#8220;that artist&#8217;s neighborhood full of Bohemians&#8221;, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too&#8212;her most famous book about &#8220;peasants&#8221; is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage&#8212;Wharton&#8217;s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary&#8212;on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.&#8212;are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton&#8217;s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 
Okay, that&#8217;s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 
*What they didn&#8217;t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you&#8217;ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James&#8217; The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I&#8217;ve ever read.
ZoomInfo
This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.
All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton&#8217;s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her &#8220;circle&#8221;. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.
I wish that they&#8217;d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these&#8212;based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she&#8217;s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It&#8217;d be awesome if the music was modern too&#8230; think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could&#8217;ve been. Ugh it&#8217;d be so good!!!
If you&#8217;re a writer and haven&#8217;t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you&#8217;re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that&#8217;s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I&#8217;m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I&#8217;m making my way through her entire collected works; I&#8217;m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can&#8217;t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.
I guess you could say you&#8217;d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters&#8217; heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time&#8230; in one story there&#8217;s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in &#8220;that artist&#8217;s neighborhood full of Bohemians&#8221;, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too&#8212;her most famous book about &#8220;peasants&#8221; is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage&#8212;Wharton&#8217;s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary&#8212;on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.&#8212;are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton&#8217;s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 
Okay, that&#8217;s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 
*What they didn&#8217;t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you&#8217;ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James&#8217; The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I&#8217;ve ever read.
ZoomInfo
This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.
All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton&#8217;s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her &#8220;circle&#8221;. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.
I wish that they&#8217;d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these&#8212;based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she&#8217;s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It&#8217;d be awesome if the music was modern too&#8230; think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could&#8217;ve been. Ugh it&#8217;d be so good!!!
If you&#8217;re a writer and haven&#8217;t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you&#8217;re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that&#8217;s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I&#8217;m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I&#8217;m making my way through her entire collected works; I&#8217;m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can&#8217;t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.
I guess you could say you&#8217;d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters&#8217; heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time&#8230; in one story there&#8217;s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in &#8220;that artist&#8217;s neighborhood full of Bohemians&#8221;, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too&#8212;her most famous book about &#8220;peasants&#8221; is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage&#8212;Wharton&#8217;s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary&#8212;on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.&#8212;are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton&#8217;s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 
Okay, that&#8217;s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 
*What they didn&#8217;t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you&#8217;ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James&#8217; The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I&#8217;ve ever read.
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This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.

All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton’s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her “circle”. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.

I wish that they’d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these—based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she’s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It’d be awesome if the music was modern too… think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could’ve been. Ugh it’d be so good!!!

If you’re a writer and haven’t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you’re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that’s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I’m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I’m making my way through her entire collected works; I’m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can’t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.

I guess you could say you’d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters’ heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time… in one story there’s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in “that artist’s neighborhood full of Bohemians”, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too—her most famous book about “peasants” is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage—Wharton’s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary—on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.—are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton’s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 

Okay, that’s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 

*What they didn’t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you’ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James’ The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I’ve ever read.

6edith wharton, medium, vogue, hey lit editors over here wink wink,

yelyahwilliams:

samdesantis:

If anyone actually knows how to be a real adult, give me some tips please because wtf

just as lost as you

Source: samdesantis

Young Women Who Say They Aren’t Feminists: Leave Them Alone

erikadprice:

I actually don’t think we should shit on young women like Shailene Woodley for saying they aren’t feminists. 

Like

It’s not her fault that she’s be taught the ‘wrong’ definition of that word. It’s not her fault that she thinks it’s socially dangerous to call herself a feminist. It’s not her fault that she doesn’t see the pervasiveness of sexism. Or whatever reason it is that makes her jump back in terror from that word.

She’s just following a very common cultural script. She’s trying to get along with everybody. She doesn’t want to alienate herself from mainstream Hollywood, or all the men in her life. She doesn’t want to be marginalized by siding with the marginal. She doesn’t get it. Yet.

A lot of us were “humanists” and “post feminists” and “antifeminists” when we were teenage babies. Part of it was denial. Part of it was ignorance. Part of it was fear of social rejection. Whatever. It takes a lot of blatant sexist bullshit for most of us to decide to get angry, and assertive, and annoying, and insistent, and “misandrist”. For a long time, that’s a very scary possibility.

And think. If that’s what Shailene’s image of feminism is…where has she been learning about feminism and sexism? Probably from a lot of sexist ass dudes and a ton of women who have internalized basic-ass gender norms. People have taught her to be afraid of that word. Have some sympathy. She’s a kid. 

If anything, shitting down her throat about how she doesn’t understand and needs to learn is going to confirm all her worst, least educated stereotypes about what feminism is, and what feminists are like. It will send her running…and not into safe arms, culturally speaking. Let’s not do that to her. 

Any young woman who pulls that “I’m not a feminist! I don’t hate men!” crap is obviously really, really afraid of losing their status with and among men in mainstream culture. And when we’re talking about a fucking teenaged celebrity, that really shouldn’t be a surprise.

So let’s not threaten her further, okay? Let’s not send her running into the arms of anti-feminism or someshit. What she’s saying is not worthy of belittlement. It’s a very common reaction to years of acculturation. Our job is to make feminist observations and information available, and safely accessible and understandable, so that when they’re ready, these young women can seek them out.

Telling people what to believe and how to identify is goddamned patriarchical. 

Dang Erika is always insightful.

Source: erikadprice

6shailene woodley, feminism, medium, i am not saying i agree with her, i'm also not saying i disagree with her, i'm just saying that this is a very interesting pov, that i had never considered before, and i try to be an open minded human, so i am glad i read it,

"Don’t use metaphors in fantasy; your readers will take them literally. Or they may take them figuratively — but if so, they’ll also take your magics and transformations figuratively. Either way, you’re in trouble."

Teresa Nielsen Hayden (via writingquotes)

Haha, valid point.

millionsmillions:

"Maybe everyone writing there is really still just gunning for a book deal. But I like to think that there is another kind of fiction to be written, the truest expression of the form, which embraces the quotidian nature of Twitter and its movements in real time.”

Source: millionsmillions

"I am two fools, I know,
For loving, and for saying so."
John Donne (via observando)

(via booksandpublishing)

Do you think new authors should try to publish their books first by a publishing house? There's a lot of writers giving up the traditional way because of the Amazon facilities.
Anonymous

chuckpalahniuk:

The best reason for pursuing a traditional publishing route:  an agent, an editor, a house… is that your work is so scrutinized and you’re coached ( sometimes harshly and rudely ) to become a better writer.  Recently a long-time writer friend — Suzy Vitello — brought me a batch of stories I’d written in the very early 1990’s.   They were awful, and I was so grateful that no one had published that early dreck.  At the time, I loved them, but the writing wasn’t good. 

This is an interesting point. I’ve been wondering whether, once I finish what I’m writing (if ever), I should go to a pub house or just sell it on Amazon.

"I’d just say to aspiring journalists or writers—who I meet a lot of—do it now. Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough."
vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic
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batcii:

I was doing homework but then Hermione showed up

Oh man I love the Hermione/Matilda headcanon.

(via teachingliteracy)

Source: batcii

6hermione, harry potter, is that the proper use of headcanon?, i am an old lady, matilda,

image

Prompt by daawesomemusician:

Your main character is running and the reader doesn’t know why he/she is running or who he/she is running from until the very end.

Read followers’ works inspired by this prompt:

Submit Your Story | Yeah Write | Daily Prompts in Your Inbox

Source: yeahwriters

6RUNNING, prompt,

I am probably the last person on Tumblr to watch The Fault in Our Stars but I finally just did and man you guys did not lie about the sobbing.

6tfios movie,

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